Climate Change in Canada

Canada is the second largest country in the world, with an area of 9,984,670 square km (3,854,082 square miles). Canada has apparently been keeping track of temperatures across the country since 1948. The number of weather stations that track weather, now and in the past, is impossible to determine. Canada’s Weather and Climate website does not make it easy to find that kind of information.

Here are the reports I have been able to find about Climate Trends and Variations in Canada. All of this information is, or was at one time posted on the Canada Environment and Climate Change website. They state that this information is available for personal or public non-commercial use and may be reproduced, in part or in whole, and by any means, without charge or further permission, unless otherwise specified.

Canada 2007

temperature-trend-1948-2007

The trend over the period 1948 to 2007 shows a 1.4°C increase when looking at annual temperature departures from the 1951 to 1980 climate normal.

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Canada 2009

The blue linear trend line – national annual temperatures have warmed by 1.4°C over the last 62 years. Temperature data from more than 330 weather stations were used to compute seasonal and annual departures from normal. A Baseline Average was calculated from 1961-1990 data. The annual mean temperature departure trends for the nation as a whole and for all climatic regions showed confidence levels varying from 90% to 99.9%.

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Canada 2010

Canada 2010The red dashed linear trend line – national annual temperatures have warmed by 1.5°C over the last 63 years.

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Canada 2012

Canada 2012The red dashed linear trend line – national annual temperatures have warmed by 1.7°C over the last 65 years.

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Canada 2013

Canada 2013Annual temperatures have warmed by 1.6°C over the past 66 years.

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Canada 2014

Canada 2014The linear trend indicates that annual temperatures averaged across the nation have warmed by 1.6°C over the past 67 years.

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Canada 2015

86-Temperature trend to 2015

The linear trend indicates that annual temperatures averaged across the nation have warmed by 1.6°C over the past 68 years.

The national average temperature for the year 2015 (January to December) was 1.3°C above the baseline average (defined as the mean over the 1961–1990 reference period), based on preliminary data, which is the 11th warmest observed since nationwide recording began in 1948. The warmest year occurred in 2010, when the national average temperature was 3.0°C above the baseline average. The coldest year occurred in 1972, when the national average temperature was 2.0°C below the baseline average.

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global-and-canada-trend-2015

Global and Canada 2015 – Annual mean temperature anomalies and linear trends for the globe, all of Canada, southern Canada (i.e., south of 60°N), and northern Canada (i.e., north of 60°N) over the period 1948–2013 (relative to the 1961–1990 average). Canadian mean temperatures were computed using the CANGRD data set (updated from Zhang et al., 2000), which is based on homogenized temperature data from 338 stations in Canada.

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Stories about extreme weather are not indicative of Climate Change. It is just weather. Even with Canada’s rising annual mean temperatures, winters in Alberta can still  be brutally cold, as you can see from these photos from January 2011:

Temperature is a bit nippy in our part of Canada this morning: -25 C  (-13 F). Even without knowing the exact temperature, we know it is cold. The Jeep won’t start. What does -25 C look like?

I aimed my camera at the ice on the lower part of the windows, and this is what I saw.

Raise the camera up a bit, and this mornings sunrise is much clearer, as is the snow that has drifted in to block the patio door.

What good is an icy cold day like today if I don’t make the remark, “We could sure use some Global Warming up here!”

To be clear, no particular absolute global temperature provides a risk to society, it is the change in temperature compared to what we’ve been used to that matters.
– Real Climate.org –

Post 86

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