Winter Weather – Snow Words

The topic of weather is often how we start a conversation in Canada. While we don’t always enjoy the extreme climate that nature sends our way, we sure do like to brag about it.

Here at the Red House, it has been a very cold, snowy winter. Just what is very cold? Well, we have had many, many days with temperatures  below -20 C. Just how much snow? Lots… but snow is a flighty substance. The least little bit of wind sends it scurrying about the yard, piling deep in some areas and leaving others with just a skiff. A skiff of snow. There are all kinds of words to describe snow. Skiers beg for powder snow, which ends up as packed powder at the end of the day. Avalanche patrols look for new snow on top of crusty snow. Snow fences try to control where snow drifts. Whiteouts mean you should stay home, because you won’t be able to see much of anything. Soft snow is good for making snowmen. Slushy snow means that maybe the snow boots can be replaced with rain boots.

All this snow gives us one more snow term: Snowbirds. These are not really birds, but flightless  mammals that head south for part or most of a Canadian winter. Actually, some of them fly, using carriers such as Air Canada or WestJet. But lots of them prefer the open road, navigating all types of recreational vehicles destined for the warm weather of Southern USA or Northern Mexico. It is estimated that the Snowbird population is approximately 9 million strong, though not all of them would be Canadian.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Winter can be a very pretty time of year, though the temperatures might mean I just run outside and take snow photos then dash back inside.

Canadian Seasons have been described as: Six months of winter, and six months of poor sledding. These can be broken down into: almost winter, winter, still winter and road construction season. To be more specific, the four seasons are: June, July, August and Winter.

Post 99

2 comments

There, I'm finished. Now it is your turn:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s