23 thoughts on “Hidden Valley not Invisible Valley

  1. Let me pretend to be Frank for a moment. “I’m sorry for the cretinous comment showing my ignorance. I will try to be more caring in the future and I will research all the facts before spouting any ill-advised opinions.”

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    1. Thanks Al for speaking on behalf of all the ‘Franks’ who are leaving similar comments throughout the media. Unfortunately, the real ‘Franks’ never come back to see the world through the eyes of those they berate.

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  2. Margie thanks once again for being able to put into words what the facts are and to express the thoughts of many of the cottage owners of Hidden Valley.
    Wish you could talk to Global and other media outlets on our behalf because you do it so well!
    Thanks again Margie!

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    1. Thanks Brenda. I’ve sent an email to Global, and have left comments on the news reports at both Global and the Calgary Herald. My blog is also carried in the blogging section of the Herald. I don’t know how much good that does, but I’ll just keep putting out the word.

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  3. Hi Margie,
    Frankly the Franks of the blogosphere give me pause to wonder how anyone with a brain presumably would proffer such a comment and expose themselves for being fools, rather than fact checkers. Granted that everyone is entitled to an opinion but only opinions based on careful analysis of the facts deserve any credence.

    Over the years four basic guidelines for ethical journalism, blogging and commenting have been recognized: be well informed about your subject; be honest; use sound evidence and employ valid reasoning.

    What I observe is the Franks leaving comments here there and everywhere on news report sites appear to be intellectually challenged when it comes to:
    Investigating the background;
    Getting the facts straight.
    Getting the whole story;
    Learning about all sides of the issue;
    Seeking out competing points of view;
    Demonstrating critical thinking and analytical skills.

    One wonders why the media sites they posts comments to don’t consider them to be what they are ie. anti-social, attention seekers who sow discord on the Internet by trying to start arguments and upset people. Surely we bloggers can teach the media folks a thing or two when it comes to dealing with such people. http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2013/03/27/how-to-starve-a-troll/

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    1. Thanks for your insight, timethief. I wonder how many of these comments would be left on media sites if the writer was standing face to face with the people he was criticizing.

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      1. I have met the big mouthed small brained Franks of this world who did not hesitate to bellow like belligerent bellicose bulls in face to face situations. The most effective way to deal with anyone who behaves like they come from the beta dregs of the gene pool is to ignore them. I never ever publish the crap I get from trolls. Let them starve.

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  4. They say you have really made it in the blogging world when you begin to get comments from the “nasties.” I love your response to Frank but doubt that he will pay any attention. “There is always one troublemaker in every crowd”, and since there are crowds of folks who follow you and love your good intentions, there will undoubtedly be more than one Frank in the mix.

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    1. Actually, this is the only comment like this I have ever received. I don’t really have a crowd following me either! But thanks for your support, Dor.

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  5. Good on you for holding your readers accountable for their comments. One thing I was troubled with as I read your post–and I might be exposing some of my ignorance here and you can redirect me–is the relationship between government and First Nations. It seems in any kind of assistance program or treaty settlement claims the priority tends toward the residents of the reserve. To me, if an individual has rights those rights should exist throughout Canada, but why does there seem to be an inclusion/exclusion (reward/punishment) associated with those rights for First Nations people? That is to say, why is there a priority for people living on reserves… this has always left me wondering if this really means ‘rewards for those who live in segregation/exile’ that carries over from colonialism. Perhaps the flood will be a means of exploring this issue more vigorously, and cheers to you for raising it in your blog.

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    1. Excellent questions! From what I have learned from ‘Idle No More’ and all the research I have been doing on First Nations (since the failure of our lease renewal with the Siksika Nation) – is that it is one of the goals of First Nations to increase their land holdings so that all their people can live on their reserves and become Sovereign Nations that are not integrated into Canada. (This is the simplified version.) I believe it was the hope of successive federal governments that they could get the First Nations people off the reserves and integrated into society in order to remove them from the isolation and poverty of life on many reserves.

      Someday, I’d like to write about this from the perspective of having actually stepped onto a reserve and known some of their people. But first, the tie we have as cabin owners on First Nation land has to be truly over.

      I hope if there can be one new beginning for the Nation, it will be for the flood victims to move their communities up onto the plains high above the river. But, people develop ties to the land that defy explanation! Really, if everyone in Alberta examined all the ways that Mother Nature lashes out at us – floods, hail, tornadoes, drought, snow storms – we would all just pack up and move elsewhere!

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      1. I think this will be an important book. I think this entire subject of reserves is so complicated, but such a necessary conversation for Canadians to have. I don’t know if life off-reserve is any better for First Nations people, but I often wonder if reserves is a form of segregation that perpetuates racism. I cringe every time I hear someone (white) judging with a phrase that begins with “if I had a house the government gave me….” Yes, but would you give up your choice to live wherever you want?

        More recently we’ve had a glimpse into the way building contractors take advantage of this mindset and leave shoddy, sub-standard new houses on reserves; my husband and I have had many discussions about the way humans will judge others as ‘less than’ themselves and therefore not entitled what they themselves would consider acceptable basic standards (i.e. a house that doesn’t leak water and cause mould growth).

        But that’s enough of a rant from me. I look forward to learning more about your research.

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        1. I’ve been reading a series of essays by Peter Best:
          http://www.peterbestlawoffices.com/
          I think he, and a few others have already written ‘the book’. I think I see my role as pulling all this information together into a place on the web and condensing it into a form that fits the attention span of the audience that needs to think about these things.

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  6. Yes that is the problem with the world…. Too many assumptions being made without all the facts, skim reading and thinking you know best. Not once did I hear you whine and cry for money. What I did hear was care, compassion and sympathy for all those who were involved.
    I am sorry you had such a hurtful comment…. Chin up things can only get better.

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    1. Thanks CTB – all we can hope is that those who are truly the most in need, get the help.
      I do have a selfish side, however. I really hope that this doesn’t cost me a bundle to clean up the mess my cabin so inconveniently left when it walked across the yard!

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      1. Yes and that is fair enough… I had a flood on a much smaller scale… the day I left for home when a faulty tap broke off in my hand and flooded the kitchen, dining room and part of the living room. I am hoping too I don’t need to pay for repairs since it was faulty workmanship. I think it is only fair we fear the pocketbook… we work too hard for our money and it hurts more when things cost us and it wasn’t our fault.

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  7. I was an owner of a cabin at HVGR several years back, and was out there last summer contemplating the purchase of another one….Since then my wife and I have followed the saga of all of the owners regarding the lease renewal, the vandalism, and the recent flooding…It was certainly a beautiful place, and I have many fond memories of my time spent out there…Best wishes to everyone: to the owners, and to all residents impacted by the flood in this region…

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    1. Congratulations, Craig, for not buying a cabin!
      It has been such a roller coaster ride – up when we had a lease drafted, then down when the referendum was defeated. Up when the Siksika Chief and Council held out the chance of a 2-3 year extension and then the drafting of a new lease, then down when they didn’t fulfill their offer. Then way down with the flood. The only bright spot is that we didn’t have a new lease, because then we would all be on the hook to replace our buildings and the infrastructure that we were responsible for.

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  8. Thank you so much for providing the photos and information on this site. My 79 year old father has been a resident of Hidden Valley for over 30 years. Three years ago he lost his original home at Hidden Valley to fire. Its been a long and hard 3 years for my dad. It brought tears to my eyes when he told me how the Hidden Valley community had rallied together to help him get through such a difficult time. Hidden Valley has been his permanent residence for the past 13 years and when he speaks of his time he speaks with kindness and appreciation of the people he has been blessed with in his life. As difficult as it may be, I know he will get through this as well, knowing that he has some great friends at Hidden Valley. Bless you all, and continue to take care of each other!!!
    I appreciate that Al commented as Frank should have and I hope others will think before they speak. Thank you Al, and I hope these comments are read before any more uninformed people tick the COA off. As if the community of Hidden Valley doesn’t have enough to deal with already, without adding insult to injury!!!
    I live in BC, so I have only been able to find out what I can on the internet and over the phone. Thank you for being there for those of us who can not.

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    1. Michelle – You bring up a good point about community. Hidden Valley really was a unique little community and it is hard for everyone to think it is all gone.

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  9. I was a young teenager when my dad started out at Hidden Valley. I have spent some time out there last summer and this spring with my grandson who is now 6 and a half. He loved it out there, and when I explained to him what has happened, he was very sad and disappointed that he would not be able to go there again. He was also concerned about where Great Grandpa was going to live now. We especially enjoyed the golf cart drive in last year. It’s one thing to leave the community of your own accord, but to be wiped out like this, that’s a completely different feeling all together. Life goes on, and we will find new adventures, but the memories of friends and family at Hidden Valley will forever be cherished.

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