What is a Blue Moon?

From now on we live in a world where man has walked on the Moon. It’s not a miracle; we just decided to go.
-Tom Hanks-

Every two or three years, there are two full moons in one month. The second full moon is called a Blue Moon. A Blue Moon can also occur when the moon is the third full moon in a season that has four full moons. Confused? So am I.

The term  ‘blue moon’ has nothing to do with colour.  It is more likely that the word ‘blue’ actually came from the word belewe, which meant ‘to betray’.

Last night, according to the news, there was a Blue Moon.  It was still there this morning (only in a different location in the sky, of course.)  I took photos at 9:20 PM and 6:20 AM (9 hours apart) which means the moon had traveled 20592 miles (33147 km) while I had been mostly sleeping!

spruce bough

Did you know: a day on the Moon is about 27.3 days long or maybe 29.5 days – I found several different numbers for this rotational period.  The Moon’s rotation and other complicated things explain why we always  see the same side of the Moon.

How often have you looked at the moon and were sure you could see a face? Oddly enough, I don’t see one in this photo, do you?

You moon the wrong person at an office party and suddenly you’re not ‘professional’ any more.
– Jeff Foxworthy –

28 thoughts on “What is a Blue Moon?

  1. The moon does rotate, but it takes 27.3 days to do so, the same time as it’s orbit. Therefore that part of the moon always faces us. ( I had to look this up)

    I did see a face it the moon, it looked exactly like my face that time I got wasted at a fraternity party.

    Like

    • We discussed the rotation of the moon at lunch today. By using several objects, we simulated how the moon would have to rotate in order to always present us with the same ‘face’.

      I wish I had spent more time researching this post. The Moon is a fascinating topic that I really don’t know all that much about!

      Like

  2. Pingback: Once in a blue moon… | The World Is a Book...

  3. Gorgeous photos, Margie. Isn’t it amazing how little we really know about things we see every day (night)? We take so much for granted. Thanks for opening my eyes (and my curiosity) about the moon!

    Like

There, I'm finished. Now it is your turn:

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s