Oh! Canada

A Few Things About Canada (Under construction – this page is, but I suppose the country is too…)

Canada is a very large country (geographically), with a relatively small population. It is situated north of the also geographically large United States. I think of Canada’s relationship with the United States as being similar to a youngster who is living in the shadow of an older more powerful sibling. But the older sibling is never going to grow up and move away.

BeaverThe Beaver is our National Animal. Here is my story about how the Beaver earned this honour – Thank You, Mr. Beaver.

Canada has a Coat of Arms, of course. Which led me to develop my own Coat of Arms, which I write about in My Coat of Arms.

Our National Holiday is July 1. It is called Canada Day. Here is my story about how our family celebrates it – 144 Years and Going Strong.

Another birthday – Canada -145 Years Old

A Federal Election – Politics in Action

Canada and US Taxation – Taxing the Canadians

ToonadayFinding a Canadian Friend – 52 Friends Plan

The Olympics came to Canada – 2010 Vancouver Olympics

Winter sometimes seems to go on forever – Last Snow Day

33 comments

  1. Hi Margie, i just subscribed i thought i already had 🙂 and i’m going to add you to my blogroll.

    My brother lives in Spruce Grove outside Edmonton. There are lots from Canada on wordpress but only one other from where i live 🙂

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  2. Small question: Why do you sometimes reference U.S. data for federal tax, Congress…. when you live in Canada (but I don’t know how long)?

    Just wondering.

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    • Hi Jean – Yes, I am Canadian and have lived here most of my life. I use Canadian information whenever it is available. But I have found that Canadian data is often only available as a passing reference in a news report or someones blog. It is very difficult to find the actual data source to verify the information. US data is far more readily available at the source that issued the data.

      The majority of my readers are Americans, by the way.

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  3. I would suggest using the Canadian government websites. The Canadian parliament and B.C. legislative assembly both also have rich websites that cover proposed legislation, minuted debates…called Hansard.

    Have been by formal training and career-wise a librarian in government, engineering and legal sectors for past few decades in Ontario, B.C. and now Alberta.

    I realize my blog audience is international but for areas of law, tax and govn’t decisions I lean heavily on Canadian. Sure I have opinions about Obama but I don’t follow closely at all on American politics regularily to give an informed opinion especially with a a heavily American audience. I have been trounced several times on the Net by Americans for “not knowing enough” because I don’t live in their country nor having voting rights. Fair enough.

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    • Hi Jean – Thanks for the excellent source suggestions. I will make it a point to be better informed about my own country when I cite statistics.

      When we lived in the UK, I realized that many Europeans had good feelings about Canadians, and not such good feelings about Americans. But when I questioned them about why they felt the way they did, they often pointed out lifestyle choices that were as much Canadian as they were American. Canada and the US are linked by geography. When we lived in the Middle East, we became good friends with many Americans, and I realized that our two countries are far more alike than we are different. Like it or not, Canada’s life and economy is linked to America in many, many ways. To me, understanding what is happening in the US is important, because it is often the prelude to what will happen in Canada, regardless of whether we want it to happen or not.

      The USA is like a big brother who is bigger and stronger and is never going to grow up and move away…

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  4. I just prefer to lightly educate my audience (and hopefully sort of entertain too) about Canada through my personal blog. I am Canadian-born after all and would like to claim it, express how deeply rooted I am in Canada….since I have an Asian face!

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  5. Back to visit again after too long of an absence. Love your posts and it’s always nice to read another Canadian perspective on the world around us. Thanks for following my blog–I’m clicking the sign up button on your today!
    All the best in 2012.

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  6. Found you from the Weekly Photo Challenge this week. I love the feel of your blog. I am a UK citizen currently living in BC. For how long I’m not sure. Loving every minute of it here. One thing I can say about you Canadians – you are so welcoming.

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  7. hi Margie, thought i would say boo – as a fellow blogger, and also as a fellow Canuck 😀
     
    i enjoy meeting bloggers from all across the planet and find that in many respects, as global neighbours, we share a lot more common interests, experiences, hopes and dreams than those which may allegedely separate us. and we are all the richer for having rubbed shoulders.
     
    thanks for sharing your thoughts and clicks in this beautiful blog!

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  8. Hey Margie: Bumped into your blog today. Really enjoyed your writing. I’m from Canada as well – southern Ontario. Check me out. So glad I found you! Looking forward to reading more. Cheers!

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  9. I have no idea how you found me but I’m glad you did because I found you! I love it here. Think I’ll wander your garden for awhile…
    p.s. I love the fact that you are one of my countrywomen! I shall be back to find more Canucks!

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  10. Hi Margie, Where ‘abouts’ in Canada are you? I am Canadian, but living abroad and have for 3 years now. It is nice to find other Canadians here and abroad. Sometimes it is nice just to have someone get the references and not think we put maple syrup on everything 😉

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    • I’m from Alberta, but have lived in the UK and the Middle East. We also lived in Texas for a while, and have recently started spending part of our winter in Arizona.
      Yes, I know what you mean about how nice it is to meet people who you don’t have to explain everything to!
      Interesting you should mention Maple Syrup. Maples, the syrup kind, don’t grow in Alberta, and the Canadian Maple Leaf – well those maples don’t grow in Alberta either. I’ve often thought that many of the things that are deemed to be Canadian, are really quite foreign!

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      • Too funny! Well I guess when the symbol was ‘born’ it was before we were united coast to coast (if public school history serves me correct).
        There is a tree here in Shanghai and the leaves are similar to a maple and the kids always pick me some and tell me it is my Canada leaf 🙂
        I guessed you were Northern Ontario from the picture.
        Nice to meet you eh? (really I don’t often say eh, but you know gotta show the sterotype ;))

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    • Welcome to my part of Canada – the western bit of it. I’m glad to say my mid-life crisis was long ago, though there are days I think crisis is a cyclical thing that comes and goes no matter how old you are!

      Liked by 1 person

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