Category: Writing Letters

Where is the Letter ‘F’?

Can you find the shape of the Letter ‘F’ or ‘f’ in the photos below?

British Columbia

Courthouse, Nelson, British Columbia

stile

Ceramic fence stile

Disney World

Epcot Japan, Disney World

Alberta Canada

Wooden fence

The letter ‘F’ is used as an abbreviation for:
Fahrenheit
False
Failing Grade
Female

Did you find a ‘F’ or ‘f’ in each of the photos? I’ve posted the answers at Photos Containing the Letter ‘F’.

Where is the Letter ‘E’?

Can you find the shape of the Letter ‘E’ or ‘e’ in the photos below?

The letter ‘E’ is used as an abbreviation for:

e – electron
E – Energy
E – East
e – email
e – electronic
E – Euro
E – Failing Grade

Have I missed any other famous uses for ‘E’?

Did you find a ‘E’ or ‘e’ in each of the photos? I’ve posted the answers at Photos Containing the Letter ‘E’.

Where is the Letter ‘D’?

Can you find the shape of the Letter ‘D’ or ‘d’ in the photos below?

lake ice

pushb utton

Arizona

In my Arizona back yard – a Cottontail Rabbit

vegetables

clay large

The letter ‘D’ is used as an abbreviation for:

d – died
D – Music Note
D – School Grade
D – Chemistry – Deuterium
D – Battery
D – Shoe Width
D – Roman Numeral for 500
D – Diameter

Have I missed any other famous uses for ‘D’?

Did you find a ‘D’ or ‘d’ in each of the photos? I’ve posted the answers at Photos Containing the Letter ‘D’.

Post 573

Where is the Letter ‘C’?

Can you find the shape of the Letter ‘C’ or ‘c’ in the photos below? (Hint for the flower photo – the ‘C’ is green, not pink or yellow.)
Alberta pink

Alberta

purple yellow hot rod

The letter ‘C’ is used as an abbreviation for:

C – Century
C – Celsius
©- Inside a circle as a Copyright Symbol
C – Music Note
C – Bra cup size
C – School Grade
C – Shoe Width
C – Roman Numeral for 100

Have I missed any other famous uses for ‘C’?

Did you find a ‘C’ in each of the photos? I’ve posted the answers at Photos Containing the Letter ‘C’.

Where is the Letter ‘B’?

Can you find the shape of the Letter ‘B’ or ‘b’ in the photos below? (Hint: You might have to look for pairs of circles!)

Some famous ‘B’s
Bubble and Bobbin (3 out of 6 letters are b’s)
Plan B
Hepatitis B
Vitamin B
Type B Blood
B Musical Note
B Boron
B Shoe Size
B Bra Size
B-2 Stealth Bomber
B-29 Superfortress
B-52 Bomber
B Movies

Have I missed any important ‘B’ designations?
Did you find an ‘B’ in each of the photos? I’ve posted the answers at Photos Containing the Letter ‘B’.

Where is the Letter ‘A’?

I have been sorting through photos, both the paper ones in boxes and the digital ones on my computer. It has been a big task that makes me wish I had developed a file naming or sorting system that was more descriptive than, for example, ‘UK’ – which has 79 sub-folders. It will take some time to sort through over 1500 folders and move them into more suitable descriptive locations. It has been fun, though, to revisit the past and in the process I’ve stumbled upon the fact that there are Letters of the Alphabet  in many of my photos.

Can you find the shape of the Letter ‘A’ in the photos below?

Windermere British Columbia

Stolen Church, Windermere, British Columbia

Hint: – look at the three windows, and the front door!

Fun Facts about the Letter ‘A’:

Which common English words have the most “a’s” in them?
The 6 letter word ‘banana’ and the 8 letter word ‘caragana’ can both boast being 50% ‘a’.

If plan A doesn’t work, the alphabet has 25 more letters.
― Original Author Unknown –

Did you find an ‘A’ in each of the photos? I’ve posted the answers at Photos Containing the Letter ‘A’.

Photographs and the Right to Privacy

When you snap a picture of another person, two fundamental rights often come into play: the
right of the photographer to free expression and the right of the subject to privacy (the right to be left alone).
– Lien Verbauwhede, 2006 –

On my blogs, the right of privacy always outweighs my right as a photographer. This poses a dilemma (which I always thought was spelled dilemna) because sometimes the story I am telling is best illustrated with a photo of people.

19-card-sharks

I use two solutions – sometimes I crop the photo to remove faces in addition to using filters to alter the photo. This was an effective way to treat this photo, because the topic was hands, and the photo was called ‘Card Sharks’.

19-card-sharks2

The second solution is to simply experiment with filters until I find one that disguises the faces. This photo of the ‘Card Sharks’ was not as effective as the first photo, though it did a good job of ensuring privacy.

19-5th-birthday

This was a photo of my 5th birthday party. I loved the result of a cross-hatch effect.

 Post 333

The Alphabet has 26 Useful Letters, But Some are More Popular

I’ve came to the conclusion that while the English language contains 26 Useful Letters, certain letters receive disproportional attention. Generally they are the ones at the beginning of the alphabet. When I was in school, teachers used children’s last names, in alphabetical order, to assign tasks. These included going up to the blackboard to do a tricky bit of arithmetic, or running an important errand. Often the teacher started at the beginning of the alphabet with each new day. My last name came near the end of the alphabet, which was a mixed blessing. Sometimes the bell rang before it was my turn to go to the board. But sometimes it meant I never got picked to do delivery jobs that got me out of class.

The dictionary plays up the fact that some letters are more special than others. My copy of Webster’s has lovely incised tabs, and it allots one whole tab to each of the first three letters – A, B and C. Only one other letter receives the same attention – the extremely useful letter S. All the other letters must share a tab with at least one other letter until it gets near the end of the alphabet. W to Z are all lumped together like an afterthought.

I take exception to that, as I am very fond of the letter W. It has been anchoring my last name since the day I said “I Do.” W shouldn’t be thrown in with X, Y and Z, letters that are clearly more limited in practical use. If you doubt the value of a W, think what the lovely phrase “Worthy Words” would be like without a W. “Orthy Ords” just doesn’t sound right.

May God forgive me, but the letters of the alphabet frighten me terribly. They are sly, shameless demons – and dangerous! You open the inkwell, release them; they run off – and how will you ever get control of them again!
– Nikos Kazantzakis –

Post 192

Complaints Department – Too Many Words, Too Little Time

woman talking blah blah blah

The Crabby Lady from the Complaints Department stopped by this morning. “There are just way too many words.” she griped. “They are coming at me from every direction. Phone calls, emails, text messages, internet, radio, TV… You know, people blame all the extreme weather on global warming, but I know what is causing it – all those words whizzing through the airwaves…”

Her tirade stopped as suddenly as it started. She realized she had used up most of her quota of words for the morning, and she still had a few to give to the weatherman if he forecast another day of high winds. She slapped a sticky note on my forehead, then marched back to the outer reaches of my mind.

The sticky note said, “Cut the crap. You are using too many words.” I shrugged off her stinging criticism, and opened my Google Reader. I follow lots of interesting blogs, and always look forward to seeing what other bloggers have to say. My Google Reader announced, “I’ve missed you. Where have you been for the past few days? Your absence means you have 145 unread feeds to read…” Whoa. Too many words.

One day away from my computer and I was snowed under. So I spent several hours picking my way through other peoples words, and came up with a few promises that I think the Crabby Lady can live with. Feel free to use any of them, because my Crabby Lady thinks some of you use way too many words too.

1. I have resigned from the WordPress Postaday 2011 Challenge. I don’t have the time nor topic ideas to churn out something worthy enough for you to read each day. That is not to say I won’t someday write a pithy post about breakfast cereal, but I will spare you from posts about how I have NOTHING to say. Leave that to Twitter.

2. I will Proofread what I write, and I will take out all the words that don’t add anything to the meaning. Most of my posts start out at around 700 words, and end up at about 500 words. If I have a very long story to tell you, I will make sure that each and every word adds content, and that it isn’t just a long post because I was too lazy to edit.

Writing is easy. All you have to do is cross out the wrong words.
Mark Twain

3. I will do some Research before I express opinions on something. I will acquaint myself with at least the rudimentary facts about an issue or idea. Factless, regurgitated opinion is a waste of words.

4. Not everything I write about will be of Interest to everyone. Sometimes even The Car Guy isn’t interested, but I ignore that one small flaw in his character. But there will be one little bit of truth or wisdom in every post I write… unless I accidentally edit it out. Sometimes I cross out a few right words too.

(And this is what 501 words looks like.)

Post 167

Bad Spellers of the World, Untie!

books trip

It is a damned poor mind that can’t think of at least two ways of spelling any word.
– Andrew Jackson –

When I was living in the Middle East, we got into a debate about how to pronounce aluminum. The East Coast American who had lived in New Orleans and Scotland pronounced it one way. The Indian who had lived in Africa pronounced it another. The Australian thought they were both wrong, and I, as a Canadian who had lived in Texas and England, really wasn’t sure any more… Of course, the word is also spelled aluminium, which helped to explain part of the difference in our perspectives. Variances in spelling and pronunciation crop up in each and every Country where English is a spoken language!

English is, of course, an evolving language with new words, and meanings for words, being added daily:

Here’s a brain twister. Can you use the word ‘capitulated’ in a sentence where it doesn’t mean ‘Your hat’s on backwards’?
– Joe Martin –

If that doesn’t create enough confusion, each and every person who speaks English does so with varying ability:

…I struggled through the alphabet as if it had been a bramble-bush; getting considerably worried and scratched by every letter. After that, I fell among those thieves, the nine figures, who seemed every evening to do something new to disguise themselves and baffle recognition.
– Charles Dickens –

A learning disability, such as Dyslexia, can make reading, writing and spelling quite a challenge. Many very Talented People are dyslexic, which just goes to show that you don’t have to know how to spell Outstanding, to be Outstanding! That leads me to think that the fact that I am NOT dyslexic might be the biggest roadblock to my success as a well-known writer, surgeon, singer and world leader….

Writing is easy. All you have to do is cross out the wrong words.
– Mark Twain –

Post 108

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